Different Personalities and Feedback

1. Perfectionist ‘If a job’s worth doing it’s worth doing well.’

Description

You are quite a serious-minded person and do not readily let go of your
inhibitions. You pride yourself on your discipline, organisation and quality
control. You concentrate on doing things right and can be preoccupied with
the importance of not making mistakes. You are able to spot mistakes and
people can sometimes regard you as overly critical. This is particularly true
when you are in a supervisory role, although you are as hard on yourself as
you are on others. If you commit to a task you will ensure it is done to the
highest standards. You worry about doing the right thing and have a cautious
nature. You are prepared to work hard and may even be described as a
workaholic. Your conscientious nature precludes the need for close
supervision.
When you are under pressure you tend to work even harder and lose touch
with your own emotional needs. You have high personal standards and high
expectations of the way others should conduct themselves in the workplace.
You have a tendency not to delegate as you feel that no-one could do the task
as well as you. People may find it easier to work with you than for you, as you
are such a perfectionist.

You are polite, but are prepared to be direct and can feel a strong sense of
righteous anger when people do not do the right thing. Your reaction will be
even stronger if it does not seem to concern them. As a general rule though,
you don’t like to express anger in the workplace. People may regard you as
formal and a stickler for doing the right thing. You have a tendency to see
things in either black or white, as either right or wrong. You have a strong
need to be as close to perfect as you can in anything you do. You can
sometimes feel that life is not fair when things are not working out. You are
often uncomfortable with rapid change in the workplace and dislike having to
make decisions on the run. You like to deal with real issues and others tend to
regard you as grounded.

Key motivators

  • The need to be right and to be seen to be right
  • To work towards the highest goals and ideals
  • To improve self and others

Leadership style

  • Hardworking
  • Thorough
  • Controlled
  • Exact
  • Conservative
  • Honest
  • Steady
  • Practical
  • Structured
  • Independent
  • Methodical
  • Principled
  • Logical
  • Measured
  • Goal-oriented
  • Impersonal
  • Reasonable
  • Analytical

Considerations for giving feedback

  • Make sure you seem prepared.
  • Take a structured and systematic approach.
  • Make sure you do not make mistakes.
  • Be sensitive to the participant’s self-critical nature.
  • Pick up and gently challenge examples of black and white thinking.
  • Establish to what extent the participant is driving themselves to achieve
  • perfection.
  • Encourage feelings to surface.
  • Encourage the participant to put themselves in another person’s shoes.

Considerations for receiving feedback

  • Focus on the positive feedback in the report – no-one is perfect!
  • Are you overly critical and judgmental of others?
  • Do you give positive feedback to others?
  • How high are your stress levels?
  • Do you sometimes lose sight of the big picture and get lost in the detail?
  • Do you ever have any light-hearted and spontaneous fun in the
  • workplace?
  • How often do you engage your creative side?
  • How well do you market yourself?
  • Take opportunities to discuss the report with others

2. Helper ‘Give to others and you will reap the rewards’

Description

You readily offer to help others and can pick up on people’s needs easily,
sometimes even before they do. You enjoy being needed by others and it is a
source of personal pride and job satisfaction. You dislike working in a role
where you are unappreciated or working in isolation. You are action oriented
and enjoy taking control of a situation and making others’ ideas happen. You
play a very positive role in a team as you tend to see the best in others and
look out for others. You focus on treating others as you would like to be
treated.
You have a tendency to focus on others’ needs and to lose your own identity.
This makes it difficult for you to be assertive and effectively negotiate for
results. The most stressful times in your career are when you experience
personal rejection, which may result in feelings of hurt and anger.
The most important aspect of work for you is relationships. You are very tuned
in to the workplace climate and culture. You would describe yourself as a
generous person, although others can regard your generosity as manipulative
or believe that you meet your own needs through being needed by others.
You are a people person and naturally affectionate. At work people may
become impatient with you and believe that you can be too much focused on
the world of feelings. You enjoy interacting with all types of personalities and
believe you are able to bring out the best in people who others find difficult.
You enjoy helping the underdog or underachiever and generally don’t enjoy
being the star of the show, although you do like to be appreciated. You will
often find yourself playing the part of the indispensable right hand. You admire
people who are successful and like to be respected by them. You are a
positive person who enjoys encouraging others and suppresses your more
negative feelings. You find it hard to accept criticism about yourself, as it is
important that others see you in a positive light. You are reliable and like to
meet your commitments

Key motivators

  • To be needed by others
  • To be appreciated
  • To be included

Leadership style

  • Relationship focused
  • Emotional
  • Energetic
  • Positive
  • Popular
  • Sensitive
  • Client focused
  • Empathetic
  • Sincere
  • Warm
  • Generous
  • Team focused
  • Coaching
  • Considerate

Considerations for giving feedback

  • Create a warm rapport at the beginning of the session.
  • Thank them for participating in the process.
  • Be tactful when offering feedback which may be perceived as critical.
  • Explore what could motivate the participant apart from being appreciated by others.
  • Help the participant focus on their underlying needs.
  • Explore how much time the participant spends on their own at work.
  • Reinforce that negative emotions can be used very constructively in the workplace.

Considerations for receiving feedback

  • Remember to stay objective when reviewing the report.
  • What are your own needs and wants? Are you attracted to relationships that have obstacles?
  • How much do you focus on task issues compared with people issues?
  • Are you able to focus on the task and resist the temptation to connect with the people?
  • How dependent are you on others for approval?
  • Do you project a nice person image and deny your negative feelings?
  • Do you create dependency relationships in the work place?
  • Remind yourself to avoid the automatic ‘helper’ role in the future.

3. Achiever ‘Winners are grinners’

Description

You are a goal oriented and a go-getter. You are usually working towards
many goals at the same time and are exceptionally efficient at achieving
them. In fact, you are capable of working like a machine and can expect the
same of others. High-profile success is very important and you like to present
yourself as being accomplished. Failure is something that you avoid at all
costs. It is difficult for you to acknowledge to yourself and to others that you
have failed. You will work harder if success is under threat and will suspend
your feelings and just focus on the task. You avoid a loss of hope and
negative feelings by engaging in problem-solving activities. You trust yourself
more than anyone else to get things done well. You focus on people
responding to you favourably. You know what you think and are prepared to
be direct and down to earth. You get on well with a range of people.
You sometimes find yourself volunteering for tasks that you are not really
qualified for, but manage to pull them off. This reflects a tendency to overrate
your own ability at times. You tend to jump into a task readily and sometimes
forge ahead too quickly, ignoring important details. You can pick up an idea
and run with it quickly and once you get going you really don’t like
interruptions. You are competitive, even with yourself, and like to win.
You often find yourself in leadership positions and this is your preferred role.
You are a good team player if you identify with the team’s goals. Picking
winning business opportunities is a natural skill. Promoting yourself is
something you do with confidence and ease and you are comfortable in a
selling role. You project a winning image. However, you can be a chameleon
and adopt a socially desirable image that meets the needs of those you are
trying to impress. Being unnoticed is not appealing and you like to impress
others.
You are always busy and on the go and don’t like a lot of downtime. There is
no such thing as ongoing boredom. You worry about job and financial security
and work hard to ensure you have both. Being appreciated for your efforts
and achievements is more important than being liked. You thrive in a
workplace which provides opportunities for advancement and rewards and
also cannot work in an environment which is devoid of positive feedback. You
favour a more creative role, but are prepared to do non-stimulating tasks if it
meets a personal goal.

Key motivators

  • Any tangible rewards on offer
  • Achievement and success
  • Personal recognition and affirmation

Leadership style

  • Efficient
  • Motivated
  • Confident
  • Achievement oriented
  • Energetic
  • Competitive
  • Fast moving
  • Future focused
  • Committed
  • Positive
  • Upbeat
  • Encouraging
  • Practical
  • Team focused
  • Responsible
  • Tenacious
  • Hard working
  • Market oriented
  • Adaptable
  • Motivating

Considerations for giving feedback

  • Make sure the participant has actually stopped working and that there will be no interruptions.
  • Establish a rapport by opening with some positive feedback.
  • Explore the issue of the importance of achievement.
  • Try to explore real feelings, not just stated ones.
  • Be tactful when offering feedback which may be perceived as critical.
  • Check whether the participant can be pushy when they are in pursuit of a goal.
  • Ask the participant to explore the image they project in the workplace.
  • Explore how much energy the participant puts into meeting their own needs.

Considerations for receiving feedback

  • Remember that criticism does not imply personal failure.
  • How much time do you spend in reflection?
  • Do you cut corners to save time?
  • Are you overly focused on achieving results at all costs?
  • Do you pay close attention to detail and quality control?
  • How important is personal success?
  • Do you avoid conflict and topics that relate to feelings and emotions?
  • Do you alter your image and approach to impress important people at work?
  • How readily do you take command of others?
  • Do you make sure you recognise other people’s contributions and not just your own?
  • How do you cope with criticism?
  • Schedule in regular reflection time at work.

4. Artist ‘Connecting with people deeply gives life its necessary edge’

Description

You are very creative, sensitive and aesthetic. You can readily feel other
people’s pain and are truly empathetic when people are in crisis. In fact, you
are attracted to people who are in emotional pain. You often feel a sense of
emptiness at work, almost as if something is missing. You do not enjoy tasks
that you consider boring and tedious and can feel devalued if you are given
menial tasks. Boredom is your major enemy in the workplace and you thrive
when you have an opportunity to produce something distinctive.
You are attracted to romance and relationships. You are interested in the
people you work with and enjoy becoming involved in their lives. However,
when you form strong relationships with people in your team you can often
feel yourself drawing away.

At work you believe your most valuable contribution is creativity and
originality. You need outlets for your self-expression. When you are working
well you are very capable of bringing your creative tasks to fruition. However
the people issues easily distract you from the task. You may need more
structured individuals to keep you on track.

You can be reckless and will sometimes break the rules to avoid being
trapped in the ordinary. Feeling misunderstood and alienated is quite a
common experience for you. You have a need to be heard and to have your
opinions valued. Above all, it is important to be understood. You feel unique
as a person and it is important to have your ideas and vision recognised. You
sometimes experience a rage of moods all in the one day – sometimes on top
of the world to quite down. This is related to avoiding the mundane at all
costs. It is difficult having a thin skin and feeling down is something you live
with a great deal. Others sometimes see you as pessimistic and melancholy,
particularly when you are feeling stressed. Understanding yourself is a very
important and ongoing quest. One of the difficulties you have at work is
sometimes feeling envious of those who seem to have what you want. This
can result in you engaging in competition and even wiping out the
competition.
You find it difficult to work in a team, particularly when you are the least
skilled. You do like special attention from those you consider the golden
people. You do not want to be just one of the crowd. You are sensitive to
rejection or exclusion. Following the vision or dream can really energise you
and you sometimes throw caution to the wind in its pursuit. It is the thrill of the
chase rather than getting there which motivates you. You often find yourself in
roles that involve emotional intensity or associated with a worthwhile cause
such as crisis counsellor. You need to believe in the cause and to see the
challenge to stay focused.

Key motivators

  • Recognition and rewards that distinguish them from others
  • Emotional engagement with people
  • Interesting and varied work

Leadership style

  • Energetic
  • Vigorous
  • Goal focused
  • Unique presentation
  • Heart driven
  • Competitive
  • Challenging
  • Motivating
  • Moody
  • Subjective
  • Emotionally intense
  • High standards
  • Flexible
  • Spontaneous
  • Non-rule driven
  • Self-expressive
  • Innovative
  • Stimulating
  • Inspired
  • Imaginative
  • Self aware
  • Genuine
  • Sense of humour
  • Principled

Considerations for giving feedback

  • Create a warm and personal atmosphere.
  • Ask the participant to describe their strengths and challenges.
  • Reinforce the importance of their contribution.
  • Use your sense of humour – it will be appreciated.
  • Be careful when focusing on areas which the participant may be sensitive about.
  • Explore how they stay committed and interested at work.
  • Explore how they believe they make a unique contribution.

Considerations for receiving feedback

  • Stay objective when reviewing the report.
  • How do you stay on task in the workplace?
  • Do you need to work on being a team player?
  • Would others describe you as moody and/or emotionally intense?
  • Do you receive enough special attention at work?
  • Are you overly focussed on people issues?
  • Do you love and create a sense of drama?
  • Explore ongoing learning opportunities with your manager.

5. Observer ‘Watch and you will see what others do not see’

Description

You do not look for attention in the workplace and you prefer to work on your
own. Teamwork and open plan work environments are not appealing to you
as they disrupt your thinking patterns. You prefer to be given time and space
to think things through on your own and don not like having to think on your
feet. You can find it difficult to be spontaneous.
You have a natural thirst for knowledge and learning and it is important that
you achieve a depth of understanding. You enjoy research activities and
people often seek you out for your opinion and expertise. Your source of
power in the workplace is your knowledge, although you do not offer
information readily. You are not interested in the frills and trappings; you can
get by as long as you have what you need to continue thinking. You are not a
person who indulges in life’s excesses.
You do not like to be drawn into other’s worlds and you value your
independence and privacy. You use your energy to focus on what is
important. You do not readily reach out to people at work and you do not
enjoy small talk. Sometimes your need for privacy and detachment may be
interpreted as arrogance and rejection. Some people may describe you as
detached and aloof and sometimes you feel detached from yourself, almost
as if you are an interested bystander observing